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Full text of "Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (1888)"

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF TDE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, 

FOB THE 

SCHOOL YEAR ENDING- DEC. 31, 1888. 



Id 



ANNUAL REPORT 



l> 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 



Office 
Si •i'eihxtesijest of Public Instruction* 
TAt.LAttA.sssB, Fla., Dec. 31st, 1888. 



*i ;■ 



To Ilia Excellency, Edward A. Perry, Governor of Florida : 

Sik : — In accordance with the requirements of the law, I have 
the honor to render my report of the work of the Department 
of Education for the year ending Dee. 81st, 1888. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 

Yonr obedient servant, 

ALBERT J. RUSSELL, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



REPORT. 

The timers past, when it was necessary for the officer in 
charge of the great interests of popular education to feel the 
necessity of either argument or persuasion, to induce the peo- 
ple generally to avail themselves of the inestimable privilege 
of the public school. 

Every county in the State is now thoroughly organized, and 
in almost every settlement or neighborhood in the counties there 
is a school organized and operated, the door of which is wide 
open to every child, schools for both the white and negro chil- 



drcr>, and over seventy-two per cent of the children as enumer- 
ated in the school census of 1888, are in attendance upon them, 
and are being educated in the common school branches, 

Illitiracy is being rapidly banished from the State, as the 
older freedmen and their coeval family connections pass out of 
life, and their children are receiving the benefits of ihe school, 
while the children of the white population, specially of the 
poorer laboring classes are very largely in attendance upon 
them. The number of schools are being increased from year to 
year, as the demand of our ever increasing population requires, 
and our far stretching forests and plains are giving way to 
homes of settlers, anil heing transformed into orange groves, 
fruit orchards, or waving fields of cane or fleecy Met, and the 
tobacco plant. School trustees, parents and guardians and 
teachers join Heartily with school officers in their efforts to im- 
prove methods in teaching, and in making the school room a 
place where nut only the mind, but the heart and hands may 
be trained into practical, useful, and noble manhood and wo- 
manhood, training the mind, the affections and the musele up 
into a full roundness. 

Notwithstanding xll this may Ik- truthfully said of our school 
work, there is much yet to be done on the line of development ; 
we want, better equipment, appliances, facilities in every school 
room. I am glad to note that many counties are awake to the 
importance .of these essentials, arid globes, wall maps, charts of 
various kinds, simple philosophical instruments for intellectual 
diveribemeut and practical illustration of lessons studied, are 
now supplied, and it may be IV-rvi-ui 1 y hoped that every school 
in the Stale, will before very long, however humble or small the 
neighborhood, be thus supplied ; then the crudest log house 
school room will in its interior be transformed into u place of 
profound interest and delight lo every child, and many, many 
parents, will look u[ new help in the new methods of train- 
ing their children with approval and sdmiiation. I feel I cannot 
too strongly urge the supply of these very necessary helps, from 
time to time as the means at their command will warrant, upon 
the Boards of Public Instruction and the County Superin- 
tendents of the various counties. 

STATE IJtSTTTUTIONfi, 

The State Institutions arc also in a flourishing condition, and 
are doing a noble work for the Stale. The State Normal Col- 
lege lor th« training of while teachers, located at DeFuniak 
Springs, Walton county, though but in its second year, has en- 
rolled sixty students, young men and women, who are being 
prepared and trained to enter the school room as teachers of 
the children ot the State, aud are making great progress. The 



course of study in this college consists of twoyearB, embracing 
a study of methods, organization, and discipline, and graduat- 
ing at the expiration of the second year, when' the graduate will 
receive io addition to a diploma a first class certificate, which 
will be permanent. 

Ad academic course is also arranged for those in whose cases 
it may be necessary in order to qualify them to take the Nor- 
mal course. This course is designed to finish or complete such 
preparation as may have beeD received in other schools, and to 
supply whatever deficiencies there may be in the preparation 
of any student entering the college. Tuition in this college is 
-entirely free of any charge. 

The same may be said of the college for the training of col- 
ored teachers located at Tallahassee, except that the number 
of students in attendance has not been quite as large, fifty- 
two being the number enrolled and in attendance. The same 
course of study, the same opportunity for academic instruction 
and study as in the college for the white teachers is provided 
for the colored teachers ; indeed, it has been seen that there 
lias been much more need of this academic preparation for the 
colored pupils than for the white, and it is believed it is a re- 
sult of not having properly trained teachers in all the colored 
schools in the State. This it is hoped will be corrected by the 
work of this Normal school. I refer you to the reports of their 
respective Presidents, Prof. Felkel and Prof. Tucker, (colored): 

1)kFu_\*iak Spcisgs, Fta., Dec. 30, 1888, 

To the Honorable State Board of Education : 

Gextlbmex : — I beg to submit the following report of the 
State Normal College for white students, located at this place, 
t< ir the year ending June 6th, 1S8H. The institution was open- 
ed on the first Monday in October last, with an enrollment of 
sixteen pupils, which number increased From week to week un- 
til fifty-seven names were upon our register. In our organi- 
zation we found it necessary to form the etriderts into two di- 
visions. This we did first, in order to meet '.be umqiml ad- 
vancement of the pupils, and secondly, that the classes might 
be small enough io allow the instructors to individualize as 
much as possible io their teaching. The latter reason men- 
tioned we deem an essential point in all successful school-room 
work, hecce it should be emphasized in normal school instruc- 
tion. 

As might have been expected in the first year of an institu- 
tion's existence, considerable time had to be spent in prepara- 
tory work, yet, notwithstanding this, the students io the main 



6 

have made considerable progress, and we feel assured that 
those who entered the advanced class will be able to complete 
the course prescribed within the two years. 

The pupils are almost, without exception, earnest and indus- 
trious workers, have conducted themselves with dignity and 
self-respect, s.nd, at all times, shown a willingness lo yield t" 
the direction of the faculty. Among them there is excellent 
material for teachers, and 1 am sure the State wilt be compen- 
sated through the work they will render in the scihool-room. 
•Nor will the State have to wait until the expiration of two 
years to get any return. Eleven of the students have taken 
schools in this and other counties for the ensuing summer, and 
will carry into their work the advanced methods and ideft* 
which we have endeavored to inculcate. Thus it will be seen 
that this is not a normal school in name only, but u a mattnr 
of fact is touching and influencing directly the teachers of the 
State. 

In December last the young men of the school org&aixed :i 
debating and literary society, a feature ol the institution that 
has helped to eive it interest and popularity. From the be- 
ginning the members have taken great pride in the weekly ex- 
ercises, and have seemed fully alive to the advantages they 
offered. The faculty have had general oversight and direction 
of the association, and we have been pleased to notice the 
steady improvement in the character of its work. Next year 
steps will be taken to form a society for the young ladies con- 
nected with the college. 

In conclusion, I will stale that I have been aided very great- 
ly in making the school what it is by the efficiency t»f my as- 
sistants. Prof. Graham is a young man of rare qualities, and 
as a teacher gave unqualified satisfaction, the best evidence of 
which is that not a word of complaint was heard against him 
from the- students. Miss Outerbridge, my second assistant, 
though wanting in some extent in adaptation and judgment, has 
good teaching qualities, and will undoubtedly improve with 
experience. I recommend them both for re-electioD. 

Respectfully submitted, II. N. Fklkel, 

President. 

Tallahassee, Fla., Dec. 24, 1888. 
Man, A. J. Russell, State Supt. Public Instruction, Tallahas- 
see, Fla. : 

Sib: — I have the honor to make the following report of tbe 
work of the State Normal College, for colored students, located 
in this city. 



Agreeably to the requirements of the Constitution, the last 
General Assembly passed an act creating the above named 
institution, in which a corps of teachers is to be trained who 
will supply the wants of the colored schools of the State. 
Teaching, like any other art, to be successfully prosecuted, 
mast have its workers specially trained. Much credit is due 
the teachers who have been, and are still employed in oar 
common schools; it cannot, however, detract from their merits 
to say that, owing to lack of systematic training for their 
work, they are not as thorongh and efficient as the needs of 
their pupils demand. 

The establishment of this college is therefore a wise, politic 
stroke of statesmanship, from an economic consideration, if 
from no other. The thousands of dollars now annually expen- 
ded in compensation to poorly equipped teachers will, it is to 
be hoped, in a few years be more judiciously paid to such as 
will be able to give the State a fair equivalent in their ability 
to imparl instruction by the most approved modern methods. 

The race for whom this college has been established, being 
keenly alive to the wants sought to be filled by it, have em- 
braced with readiness the opportunities it offers. 

They look to this institution, not only for a superior class 
of teachers, but for better educated persons than such as the 
limited course of study in the common schools can produce. 
In so far as their scanty means have enabled them to send their 
children hither, they have within the past year shown abund- 
ant proof of their appreciation of the Normal College. 

The late terrible scourge which afflicted the metropolis of 
the State ard places more or less dependent on its commercial 
life, has sensibly affected our attendance thus far this session ; 
we however hope that as we recede from the effects and mem- 
ory of that fearful visitation, the College will spring np with 
greater activity to the accomplishment of its mission. 

The first session, which began the first Monday in October 
of the year last past, opened with fifteen matriculates. At the 
close "of it the record showed an enrollment of fifty -two, with 
thirty-five in average attendance. The students ha^e attained 
to a very commendable scholarship. 

The faculty aim not at show and brilliancy, bnt thoroughness; 
this result, 1 feel sure, will in time be had, to the manifest ad- 
vantage of the yonth who are to come under the tuition of the 
teachers to go forth from the Normal College. 

That students may be drawn to the institution from all parts 
of the State without misgivings on the part of patrons relative 



8 

to their habits and morals while away from home, and also to 
enable indigent students to partly defray their expenses by 
manual labor, the College should be removed into the country 
and located on about a thirty acre piece of land, and supplied 
with dormitory buildings. The happy return from such an 
outlay would soon justify the wisdom of the act. 

Most respectfully, 

T. Db S. Tuck be, 
President of the State Normal College 

for Colored Students. 

BLIND AND DEAF MOTE INSTITUTE. 

The Institute for the blind and deaf mute youth between the 
ages of 6 and 21 years, located at St. Augustine, St. Johns 
county, is intended to take the place, to these deeply afflicted 
youth, of the public echool to their more fortunate fellows, 
founded in 1884. The buildings erected during that year, the 
Institute was not ready to receive pupils until December of 
that year, and is therefore comparatively young and new, and 
yet it is a source of great pleasure to me to report that an ex- 
traordinary work has been done. Twenty-five of these unfor- 
tunate ones have been in attendance, and have rapidly advanced 
in the acquirement of knowledge by a method peculiar to the 
admirable teachers employed in our Institute. Several of the 
younger pupils have been taught to articulate and speak word?, 
and some to read quite intelligibly. 

Tuition, board and clothes are all free in this institution to 
those unable to pay, tuition being absolutely free to all such 
youth of the State. 

It is designed to instruct these children in the knowledge of 
some useful and profitable trades-work, and the girls in house- 
wifery* and the duties of the home. Arrangements are now 
being made to perfect this department of instruction, while 
the Principal j Prof. Park Terrill, has been giving instruction in 
gardening, etc. 

For fuller information, the needs of the institution, and 
many important suggestions, I beg to refer you to his report 
for the years 1887-1888, on another page. 

To the Board of Managers of the Florida Blind and Deaf 
Mute Institute : 
Gentlemen:- -As the year closc-B it again becomes my duty 



9 

and pleasure to report to you tbe condition of our school, and 
the progress made during the past two year*. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The number of pupils in attendance during the period cov- 
ered by this report was twenty-five— thirteen white and twelve 
colored. Fifteen were boys and ten were girls. Of the blind 
there were six, and of the deaf nineteen, making a total in- 
crease of ten over the previous two years. 

The average attendance the past year was twenty three, an 
increase of thirteen, or more than double the average attend- 
ance of former years. 

IX THE SCHOOLROOM. 

The progress made by the pupils in their studies has been 
very satisfactory, and evidences unusual faithfulness on the 
part of teachers in their work. The system used in >hc in- 
struction of the deaf differs somewhat from that employed in 
other schools for this class, and it affords me no little gratifi- 
cation to be able to 'say that, after several years' trial, whether 
it be owing to the merits of the system or to the intelligent 
devotion of the instructors*, the results have fully met my most 
sanguine expectations. Yet better work can he done, and will 
be, when the school is fully equipped with needed apparatus, 
and sufficient teachers employed to give to each cla-s the time 
and attention it should have. 

IjEXEUALT.T. 

Our pupils have passed two pleasaut (is well as profitable 
years. Visitors have quite generally remarked that they had 
never seen such happy children. 

Iu addition to the regular schoolroom work, the boys have 
been instructed in gardening and such other out of door work 
as they could perform. 

The s^iris have been instructed in pliiin sewing »nd house- 
hold work generally, and during the past year a cooking class 
has been maintained ; the matron, in addition to her regular 
duties, giving instruction twice a week in plaiti cookery. 

KOJf - ATTK H I> A SC E. 

I would call the attention of the Board to the fact thai 
though our attendance has largely increased over that of pre- 
vious years, yst only a email per cent, of those entitled to re- 
ceive their education here are at present enrolled as pupils. I 
quote from my last report: "The principal reason for this (the 
non-attendance of the deaf and the blind children), is that un- 



10 

der onr present laws tlie attendance of pupils entirely depends 
on the desire of their parents and guardians to have them edu- 
cated, as well as on their ability to pay their traveling ex- 
penses to and from the Institute. 

"Tbe apathy with which many parents regard the question 
of their children's education, is appalling. This is due to a 
great extent to the deeper and more sympathetic affection for 
the afflicted ones, bin it is a serious mistake. And, as it is an 
acknowledged fact that every lined neated Mind or deaf person 
is practically dependent upon tb* public, and, in the case of 
the deaf, without moral responsibility, it becomes the duty of 
the State, for its own protection, if from no other motive, to 
enact laws requiring parents and guardians of such children to 
allow them to attend the Institute, or otherwise provide for 
their education. 

" And, further, the Slate should employ an agent who should 
canvass the cut in- Stale and see thai every blind or deaf child 
id receiving educational advantages : and where it is found 
that their education is being neglected, conduct them to tbe 
Institute 

"This matter is not at ail analagoii* to that of tu iking at- 
tendance at the public schools compulsory, for the average 
child, who is possessed of all his faculties, cat* make Ids way in 
the world in an humble sphere, without tbe knowledge ordina- 
rily obtained al school, but the blind or deaf child is wholly 
dependent for his livelihood on the trade which can only be 
learned at a school specially adapted to his peculiar needs. 

"The question is one of the gravest importance, and on the 
action of your honorable Board and the State Legislature, de- 
pends not only the mental and physical training, but the moral 
salvation of nearly two hundred of the afflicted children of our 

fair State." 

Tbe expense of the canvass of the State, and bringing to the 
school a large number of the children, need not be very great. 
An annual expenditure of tive or six hundred dollars per an- 
num during the next four or tive years, would undoubtedly be 
sufficient to gather within our walls the greater part of the 
deaf and the blind children in the State, who are now growing 
up in ignorance, and many of them in vice. 

CHANGES. 

There have been several changes in the corps of officers. 
Mrs. R. K. Terrell, who acted as^teacher during the latter part 
of 1886 and 188T, resigned and was elected matron in place of 
Mies E. M. Eppes, who resigned October 1st, 1887. On the 
same date Miss Kate King resumed her place in tbe Institute 



1 



11 

as teacher, and is still with us. Last April Miss Elizabeth 
Laughead was added to our corps of teachers. In January 
last the duties of matron becoming loo laborious for one per- 
son, Miss L. M. Peckham was chosen as assistant. She re- 
signed soon after, and Miss Dora Watson acceptably tilled the 
place till the end of the school year. In February of the pres- 
ent year Mr. James A. Marshall was elected as boys' attend- 
ant, which office he still holds. 

HEALTH. 

During 1887 we had considerable sickness among our pupils, 
which was directly attributable to malarial iiiHuenceK, emaua- 
line; from several stagnant ponds near the Institute. These 
hav« since been filled or d famed, since whin there has been no 
serious 3ickness in the school. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

Thanks are due the Times-Union and the good people of 
Jacksonville for an abundance of Christmas gift* and money to 

buy raort. 

To little Gibbs White, of Cedar Key, who wanted Santa 
Claus to take her share of gifts to the deal and blind children 

at St. Augustine.* 

To the Rev. C. C. McLean, Mr. O. IX Seavey, Mr. Bowman 
and others of St. Augustine, who contributed liberally to the 
Christmas cheer. 

To Mrs. J. Gummell, to whoso generosity the children owe 
a delightful day spent on North Beach, and the subscription 
price of several periodicals. 

To Mr. M. R. Bean, for free transportation to and from South 
Beach. 

To the Southern Espresa Company, and the J. St. A. & IT. 
U. Railroad Company for free carriage of Christmas boxes. 

The following named papers have also been received free 
during the past two years : 

Tbc Florida-Times L'uion . published at Jacksonville, Fin. 

News-Herald " " 

H jrldian " Tallahassee, " 

St. Johns Weekly and Cbroniule " St. Aujrustlnc " 

Mute's Ctironiele " Columbns, O. 

Deaf Mule Voice " Jockton, Hiss. 

Deaf MuleBullelln " Frurterirk, Md. 

Mate's Companion " Faribault, Mlmi. 

8 ilcut Observer " Knosvllle, Tenn. 

Mule Rans. -r " Dallas. Texas. 

Juvenile BtDger " " 



12 

Kansas Star " Olftthe, Kan. 

Tablet " Romney, W. v*. 

DeaT Hate Times " Delavan, Wis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Pabk Tebreix, Principal. 

St. Augdstlne, Fla., Dec. 31st, 1888. 

STATE AGRICCLTORAt, AXD INDUSTBIAL COL LEG K. 

The State Agricultural College, located at Lake City, Colum- 
bia county, has had its impediments and hindrance* common to 
all institutions of higher education during these five years of 
its young life ; but I have reasons now to believe that the 
crisis is passed, and that the College will move gradually on 
its way of blessing to our young men. Prejudice and false- 
hood must give way before demonstrated truth and actual ex- 
perience, and the people will see for themselves that all is 
beiug done which can be honorably done to give the State and 
her young men the very best possible opportunity for higher 
culture. While it is designed to give a thorough literary and 
scientific course at this College, it is also determined that the 
best opportunity shall be given (or a full course in theoretical 
and practical agriculture and horticulture, with full instruction 
as to field, grove and orchard ; also a full course in mechanic 
trades or the essential points in them as relates to general tool 
craft, construction ami ornamentation, so that when a student 
leaves the College versed and learned in the books', and in 
science and mathematics, he will carry with him a knowledge 
of the very practical side of busy life, which will qualify him 
better to meet all ol" its demands and cause birn to realize the 
value of the knowledge possessed by the great army of skilled 
toilers in the country. 

MILITARY. 

A military training and discipline is also given to every 
Student, engrailing apou the lite and character system and 
method in every undertaking, teaching implicit and honorable 
obedience to vested authority. 

KiJflPMKNT. 

The College is admirably equipped and furnished, and is in 
every respect a school inviting to the parents of sous to whom 
they desire to have imparted a College education. Parents or 
(Undents may select either course — the literary alone, or that 
with the agricultural or industrial, or the agricultural alone, or 
that with the industrial, according to the desire or ability to 
take these or any of them. All must take the military in- 
struction, as from that comes the discipline of the school. 

Tuition at this College is also free of any charge, and the 



18 

cost of the living of the students by a system of messing or 
college management has been reduced to about ten dollars a 
month, so that the coot of an education in the College has been 
reduced to a minimum, while all is under the eye of the Presi- 
dent and faculty. 

While this is not, nor can be, a religions or sectarian school , 
if, is the constant care and desire of the President to lead the 
mind of the students toward God as the creator and benefactor 
of the human race, and that '* the whole duty of man is to 
fear God and kepp His commandments.' 1 To this end uusec- 
tarian devotional exercises are held as opening exercises every 
day, so that while the mind is being developed the morals of 
the student is also looked after and guarded. It will not b«" 
many years before Florida will have a college comparing favor- 
ably with any institution of ihe same class in the country. It 
is supplied with an excellent corps of instructois in its faculty — 
gentlemen of high and broad culture, devoted to their profes- 
sion and gentlemanly honor, and with these admirable and 
essential qualities they are earnestly striving to endow the 
youths submitted to their training. 

isiHismiiAL training. 

Mechanic Art Hall, the work-shop of the College, was built 
during the va&ition last summer, is a large commodious build- 
ing, and is supplied with work benches, felts of wood working 
tools, lathes, jig-saws and many other mechanical appliances 
adapted to the first years' course in the mechanic arts. The 
instructor is admirably adapted to his novel aud peculiar field of 
instruction, and is doing an excellent, work. Every student is 
taking this course of instruction, and it is a pleasant scene to 
see this large work-shop, .50x90 te.et, with from forty to sixty 
stalwart boys with their long aprons upon them, sawing, turn- 
ing, chiseling, nailing, mortising anil fitting various construct- 
ive joints, developing and equipping both brain and brawn, 
resulting in an intensely practical education. 

WELCOME. 

All parents, guardians, and friends of education are made 
welcome when desirous of inspecting and examining for them- 
selves, and are earnestly invited. There are now fix by pupils 
enrolled and many more expected to eater during the next 
month. 

SEMINARIES. 

The two Seminaries, State Institutions, one being designed 
for that part of the State east of the Suwannee river, and one 
for that part west of the same river, the former is located at 



14 

Gainesville, and the latter at Tallahassee, the capital of the 
State. Both of these seminaries are excellent schools and af- 
ford a full academic course. Each of these schools are designed 
lor the pupils' from all over the division of the State for which 
they have been located, and the Presidents of both are ex- 
ceedingly desirous that the people alt over these districts 
shou hi avail themselves of the admirable opportunity offered, 
and attend upon the exercises. The presence of the dread 
pestilence in the eastern part of the State, p -even ted the regu- 
lar timely opening of the seminary at Gainesville. Col. E. P. 
Cater, President, writes, however, that he is assured of a 
good and prosperous opening for the spring term, beginning 
Jan. 2d. 1^89, and has engaged sixty pupils, representing a 
"majority of the counties composing the district in which it is 
located. This is an excellent school, designed by its manage- 
ment and faculty to give a highly practical and useful educa- 
tion, I regret I. have not a full and complete report from its 
Board of Visitor?. 

The seminary for the west opened very nearly at the regular 
time, and now has fifty students under the excellent presidency 
of Col. G. il, Kilgar, assisted by an aide corps of teachers, and 
though ihe roll ot pupils is not as large by several hundred as 
it should be from so large a district and so popnlous, yet I 
doubt if a more earnest, studious and admirably deported 
school can he found in the South. The course of study has 
been fixed high, and is designed to be a thorough course. I 
refer to the report of the President, Col. Edgar, for a more 'de- 
tailed report of the work, and the wants and necessities : 

Tallahassee, Fla., Dec. 3 1st, 1888. 

Hon. A,, J. Russell, Stale Superintendent pitMic Instruction . ' 

Dear Sir : — I hereby submit a brief report of this institution 
for the year closing to-day. 

The reorganization of the Seminary, effected in September, 
1S87, and outlined in my first annual report, has been fruitful 
of good results to the institution. The elevation of the stand- 
ard and the extension of the course of instruction, necessitated 
the rejection of thirty or more applicants for admission during 
the academic year ending June 8th, 1883; but the seven ty-dix 
students matriculated were quite as many as the faculty could 
thoroughly drill in the subjects :,o be reviewed and studied to 
conform lo the new regime. Indeed, at the intermediate ex- 
aminations, in February, it was I'ouud necessary to divide the 
lower high school class and to employ an additional teacher, to 
enable the (acuity to round up the work of the year in a satis- 
factory manner. 



15 

I am glad lo be ahta en report that the progress oi a large 
percnlage of the students was excellent, and that, some in each 
class distinguished themselves by their persevering efforts, by 
the grade of scholarship ibey attained, and by i!ieir exemplary 
deportment both in and out of school. At the close of the ses- 
sion, a gold medal was awarded by the Hoard of Education to 
the student in eaofi class who attained tho highest average on 
examination, and an additional golil medal was awarded by 
Mr. K. W. Clarke, ot* Tallahassee, to the student who attained 
the highest average in sun lies and deportment. 

The work of tin* year was closed, 8th of June, by appropriate 

public exercises in which the students, the President ot the 
faculty, the President of the Board of Education, and the Go) -• 
ernor of the tit tc participated, and the sentiment was general- 
ly expressed that the result* attained were of the most satis- 
factory character, in view of the obstacles necessary to be sur- 
mounted in the reorganization of the institution. 

O wing to the failure of not a few of the students to pass the 
required examinations, ami to the scare produced in the sum- 
mer and fall months by the prevalence of yellow fever in some 
of the towns and cities in the eastern pin of the State, fewer 
students have been matriculated this session thaD were matric- 
ulated during the same period last year ; but it is hoped that 
the number will be appreciably increased as the session pro- 
gresses, and that through faithful teaching by the taoutty, and 
the fostering care of the li »rd of E location and of the people, 
the institution may steadily develon, and we long to make its 
influence felt for good throughout the entire State. 

The present corps of students is organized into four classes — 
two high school and two collegiate. 

In two mure years the institution will have the complement 
of collegiate classes, and he prepared to graduate students in 
both the scientific and literary courses usually taught in Ameri- 
can colleges. 

One. of the features of this year, ia the introduction of draw- 
ing as one of the regular studies of each class. If the neces- 
sary funds can be secured it is proposed to make drawing the 
basis of a course -of industrial art for both sexes, which 
without interfering with the scientific and classical training, 
which experience has proven to be so essential to liberal cul- 
ture, will develop the mind along the line of the muscles, so as 
to enable the student to give material expression to his thoughts 
and to gain a practical judgment of the arts of life, so often 
wanting in cultured men, and yet so necessary to equip youth 
for the exigencies of life. 



16 

I am glad to report that some much needed additions bare 
recent); been made to the chemical apparatus, and that a few- 
valuable reference books have been bought. 

But the institution must have new buildings, more ample ap- 
pliances and a larger facalty, to Garry oat the various objects 
set forth in its charter and the plans of the honorable Board of 
Education as to its development. 

I earnestly invoke your aid and that of His Excellency, the 
Governor of the Commonwealth, in the effort to secure the ne- 
cessary funds from the legislature lo accomplish these ends. 

Respectfully submitted, Geo, M. Edgar, 

President. 
teachers* rssTrruTes. 

As is my custom, as soon as the schools were all closed for 
the summer of this* year, I organized a series of county Insti- 
tutes, providing a double corps of learned and experienced in- 
structors, and notified the County Superintendents of time and 
place, and held tli em in Gadsden at Quincy two weeks, in 
Sumter at Wild wood one week, in Lake at Leesburg one week, 
at Dade City for Ih-rnando and Pasco, at Mannville for Citrus 
county, at Arcadia for DeSoto county, at Kissimmee for Oace- 
ola county, it New Troy for Lafayette county, at Perry for 
Taylor county, and at. Lake City, two weeks, for colored teach- 
ers from all t:ounties, making eleven counties thus visited and 
instructed. Full numbers of teachers, patrons, advanced pu- 
pils and the people attended these Ii slilutes, and we feel as- 
sured I hat much good was accomplished, and greater zeal in- 
spired in every one, teacher and people. These Institutes have 
universally been the most effective instrumentality in the hands 
of the State Superintendent in awaking an interest and crea- 
ting an enthusiasm in the minds and heart* of the people in 
favor of popular education and the public school; and I earn- 
estly hope the Legislature will see tne wisdom of continuing 
the appropriation and of increasing it a few hundred dol- 
lars. The cost of these Institutes for 1888 was $1 ,387.22, 
vouchers for which are on file in this office and ready for ex- 
amination. 

A State Teachers' Institute was also held during the month 
of March at DeFuntak Springs, at which a large number of 
teachers were present and interchanged thought, query and 
experience relating to the work, lectures upon special subjects 
by prominent teachers were delivered and were then open for 
discussion by the Institute. A more earnest, diligent and en- 
quiring company of teachers it has never been my privilege to 



17 

see, and certainly the whole programme was voted as highly 
interesting, edifying and instructive. 

CONVENT] OX OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 

A Convention of Connty Superintendents was called at the 
same time and place, as required by law, and though only sev- 
enteen counties were represented by their Superintendents, these 
found much to interest and instruct them, their exchange of ex- 
perience in the management and euperin tendency was inspiring 
to some and encouraging to others. Some of the persona! experi- 
ences of some of these in getting around their large counties, 
the distances some would be required to travel on horseback or 
on foot, after having visited all schools on the lines of railroads 
and steamers, would make many a city Superintendent blnsh if 
he had ever complained of his work or thought his tisk too se- 
vere. 

THANKS. 

Our thanks are eminently due the railroads of the Stale for 
the mere nominal rate of fare given the teachers and school offi- 
cers, one-naif cent per mile each way, and to the officers of the 
Chautauqua Association tor reduced cost of living while there 
in atieiiauc>* upon the Institute. Had it not been f>r this liber* 
ality we could not have had such an assembly. 

INCH EASE is SCHOOLS. 

It will he appropriate, as this year close* your adminisl ration 
to show the increase ami growth of the Department of Educa- 
tion ilitrinj; the years embraced in your term of office, embrac- 
ing the years 1 885-1 888,- inclusive; it is as follows : The increase 
in the number of youth of the school age (between 6 and 21 
years) since the last school census is 39,00'), Recording to the 
census taken this year, 1888, the census preceding being taken 
in 188*. The increase in the number of schools for the four 
years is 745. The increase in total attendance upon the schools 
is 24,012, and in daily average attendance 17,249. The in- 
crease in the amount an<l value of school property owned by 
the various counties is $335,000. Steadily have neat and com- 
fortable and welt furnished school buildings taken the place of 
the loir home and uncomely building, ami in the cities and 
towns very Urge, commodious and haudsonib buildings have 
been erected and dedicated to the education of the youth. 

In 1882 the Superintendent reported $33,532 as total amount 
expended for school purposes. This amount may certainly be 
raised $34,000 for counties not reporting at that time, which 
2d 



18 

would make the total $117,532. The total amount expended 
for schools for 1888 is $484,110.23, making an increase of ex- 
penditure of $366,678.23. 

The increase in the Common School Fnnd ia equally grati- 
fying. In 1882 it was $326,420. VI, for this year it ia $500,400, 
showing an increase of $173,977.29. In 1884 there was distrib- 
uted of the one mill tax $27,000 in round numbers, this year 
there was distributed to the counties, according to the respect- 
ive school population, $74,000 to round numbers, showing an 
increase in the one mill tax laid by the Constitution of $47,000, 
and this left $3:), 000 not distributed because not collected at 
the time of distribution, but since paid in. 

NCUHEB OF SCHOOLS, AC. 

The number of schools opened and operated this year is 
2,249, an increase ov^r 1887 of 145 schools. There are 2,413 
teacher* employed, 1,793 white anil 020 negroes. The reason 
for the disparity in uumbers is that the negro population is 
centered about tile cities, towns and villages, ami in several 
counties of the State there are not enough of them to form a 
school, while the whites are largely engaged in farming and 
are scattered through the counties, demanding many small 
schools, while the negroes are gathered into large graded 
schools. 

INDUSTRIAL TKAINtNO. 

It lias been a special effort on the part of the Stale Board of 
Education to introduce this feature of practical educaliou into 
the whole system, and I am glad to report, very considerable 
success, a* already referred to at the State College. The Normal 
Colleges, and many of the larger of the city and village schools 
are giving earnest attention to this useful branch of a practical 
education, giving to the children of the poor and those of mod- 
erate circumstances, the advantage of the books, and also an 
insight into the useful and honorable trades and mechanic 
pursnits. 

COXG RATU L ATI OX. 

I can most assuredly congratulate the people of Florida on 
the rapid growth of her public school system, and the usclul 
features of her school work in leading her children to know 
that there is not only utility in the trades, but that honor re- 
sides in their pnrsuit. 

PBITATE SCHOOLS. 

There are 137 colleges and private schools reported by the 
County Superintendents of the State, all of which are enjoying 
a wholesome patronage. 



19 

Notable among these are Rollin's College, located at Winter 
Park, and though not sectarian, under Congregational auspices, 
DeLand University at DeLand, Baptist auspices, Florida Con- 
ference High School and College at Leesburg, M. E. C. South ; 
St. John's River Conference College, at Orange City, M. E. 
Church, and many others of excellent character. 

REFRBEXCE TO TABLES. 

For a more detailed knowledge* of the school work, the finan- 
cial relations, the number of teachers employed, the number of 
each sex, the number of those holding first class certificates, 
the school census of 1888, and many other important matters, 
I respectfully refer yon to the tables carefully prepared and 
following this report.. 

REGULATIONS. 

I have had printed in my report, the full and complete reg- 
ulations carefully prepared hy myself, under the requirement 
of the law and approved and adopted by the State Board of 
Education, and promulgated throughout the State, ami call the 
attention to all interested. In examining theBe it will be set it 
that the State Board stresses the matter of thoroughly teach- 
ing the children the awful evils of the drink habit and the 
use of narcotics, and School Hoards and County Superinten- 
dents and teachers are called upon to see to it that tins is done, 
they also press the matter of industrial training iu all the 
schools as far as practicable and at all times. 

BLANK FOEMS DISTBIBLTBD. 

I have for the year 1888- 1880 mailed or expressed the fol- 
lowing blank forms, required by the law, to I he various coun- 
ties as their County Superintendents have required them, 1,500 
copies of the School Law, 1,772 School Registers, 10,095 
Teacher's Monthly reports, 2,283 Teacher's Contracts, 5:j:i 
Second-Class Teacher's Certificates, 589 Third-Class Certifi- 
cates, 425 Blank Appointments of Trustees, and 475 Blank Ac- 
ceptances of same. 

AEBOR DAY OBSERVANCE. 

In cheerful and profitable compliance with your Proclama- 
tion, setting apart the eighth day of February, 1888, as Arbor 
Day, and inviting all the schools to join heartily in suitable 
exercises and the planting of trees, hardy herbs, vines and 
Dowers, I have the honor and great pleasure to report a deep 
interest in the observance of the day, on the part of the State 
institutions and public schools, as well as the patrons and 
friends of the schools. 

I am greatly pleased, and am sure you will enjoy the same 



20 

experience, to be able to report the great interest man i tested 
in the recurrence of tbia delightful and very profitable observ- 
ance, on the part of all the people ; they realize the truly ed- 
ucational and ennobling influence exerted as well as the profit- 
able effects and are desirouB for a continuance and permanency 
of the day, with its delightful exercises. The following state- 
ment wilt be of interest: 

450 schools are reported as participating, 21 counties report* 
ing 18,542 pupils taking part in the exercises, 4,408 pat- 
rons and friends present, 7,490 trees planted. 

The following State institutions are reported as taking ear- 
nest interest in the day. and its work and observance: The 
State Agricultural College at Lake City, the West Florida 
Seminary at Tallahassee, the East Florida Seminary at Gaines- 
ville, the State Normal School for While Teachers at DeFu- 
niak Springs, and the Blind and Deaf Mute Institute at St, 
Augustiue. 

The exercises, as reported by the various superintendents, 
consisted of short lectures by teachers and friends upon the 
importance of the trees iu their varied relations to life, composi- 
tions and recitations by the pupils, songs and glees, all of which 
were calculated to uplift those who participated, and to en- 
Ligliteo the mind and enlarge the affections, ennoble the senti- 
ments and inspire the sympathies ; it is a universal desire that 
the day be perpetuated. 

CONCLUSION". 

I cannot close this report without expressing my warm ap- 
proval of those with whom I have only been a co-worker, the 
County Superintendents without exception, the Boards of Pub- 
lic Instruction, the teachers and the people have all heartily 
sustained me and cheerily entered the work with me, and for 
them all I cherish the highest sentiments of esteem and regard, 
and to your Excellency for the irnfailiiig support, encourage- 
ment and sustenance you have given me. 

A. J. RUSSELL, 

State Superintendent Public Instruction. 



REGULATIONS 

PREPARED BT THE STATE SUPERINENDRNT OF PUBLIC IN8TRTJC. 
TION AND ADOPTED BT THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION, 



I 



OFFICEKS. 



Regulation 1. — Qualifications. — Persons, to be eligible 
to appointment to offices in this department mast be wefl en- 
dorsed as possessing, substantially, the following qualifica- 
tions : 

"They are personally known to ns as citizens of good moral 
character, upright, responsible, possessing a fair education, 
and desirous of extending the benefits of free public instruc- 
tion to all classes of youth. As officers, they will be found 
competent, impartial and faithful in the performance of their 
duties. For these reasons we commend them for appointment." 

Regulation 2. — School Trustees will be governed, in the 
general management of their affaire, under the directions of the 
Board of Public Instruction of the county. 

Regulation 3. — School Tkcstees. — One good, competent 
Trustee, who will take a lively interest in the affairs of the 
school, is sufficient. When the responsibility is divided among 
several, they will be more likely to neglect the work than one 
man, when the duty is laid upon him. Trustees are to be 
recommended by the patrons or the school, but the County 
Superintendent may exercise some discretion in nominating 
them. 

TIME OF ISSUING CEETTFieATES. 

Regulation 4.— Although a Board of Public Instruction 
may examine teachers and grant certificates, at any time, or 
authorize the County Superintendent to do so, which may con- 
tinue in force in the county for one year from date, yet it may 
be found desirable to fix upon certain days and places at which 
this particular duty will be attended to. Certificates may be 
issued to expire within the year, to correspond with the times 
of holding the meetings. By such an arrangement, both the 
board and the teachers would be accommodated. 

Ample notice should be given of all such meetings by the 
County Superintendents, so that every teacher, or person de- 



22 

■irous of teaching, may have the opportunity of preparing for 
the ex ami nation. 

Regulation 5. — Teacher's Certificates op the First. 
Class will be granted by the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction to eminently successful teachers of the second 
class who, on examination, answer 85 per cent, of the ques- 
tions submitted in the branches usually taught in high 
schools. 

Graduates of normal schools may receive First- CI ass Certifi- 
cates without examination, who hold diplomas from colleges of 
undoubted reputation and other colleges in which Pedagogics 
are taught. No exception will he made to this regulation ex- 
cept the State Superintendent shall have strong and satisfactory 
reasous for the same. 

Regulation 6. — Third and Second-Class Certificates will be 
issued by the County Boards of Public Instruction based upon 
the following : 

Any person, to be considered a teacher in the meaning of 
the school law, or entitled to compensation for services or any 
of the privileges and immunities of a teacher, must, at the time 
of performing the services or claiming the immunities, hold a 
teacher's certificate unimpaired by suspension, revocation or 
limitation. 

Eligibility. — A candidate for teaching, to be eligible to an 
examination, must produce satisfactory evidence of being of 
strictly temperate habits, and maintaining a good moral char- 
acter. 

Aud — 

1st. To be able to read intelligibly from any school reader in 
common use, and properly leach the same. 

2d. To spell correctly the words of any ordinary sentence. 

3d. To be able to write well and teach the same. 

4th. To solve readily the questions involving the rules of 
arithmetic, to square root, and to explain the principles on 
which their solution depends. 

5th. To have a general knowledge of geography : as the lo - 
cation and boundaries of continents; the relative positions of 
the principal countries, oceans, seas and rivers ; the boundaries 
and capitals of the United States aud of the several States and 
Territories, and the counties and rivers of Florida. 

6th. To have a general knowledge of the history of the Uni- 
ted States and of the State of Florida 

7tb, To have a good, practical knowledge of school organ!" 



23 

* 

ration, classification, management and discipline, and of the 
arts of interesting youth and imparting instruction. 

Remark. — No certificate will be issued to applicants who, on 
examination, fail to answer 75 per cent, of the question sub- 
mitted in the above branches tor a Third Class Certificate. 

The following for a Second Class Certificate: 

Second Class, — In addition to the foregoing'qualifications, 
a candidate for a Second Class Certificate must, on examina- 
tion, be able — 

1. To read with ease and accuracy. 

2. To write a plain, free hand, and teach the same. 

3. To spell correctly. 

4. To solve readily the questions in any practical arithmetic 
in common use. 

5. To have a good knowledge of geography. 

V 6, To be familiar with the English Grammar, so as to apply 
its principles correctly in composing, spelling and punctuating 
a letter, or any ordinary sentence. 

7. To have a good knowledge of the outlines of general his- 
tory, and especially that of the United States and of Florida. 

8. To be acquainted with the elements of book keeping. 

9. To understand and be able to explain the principles which 
underlie the branches taught. 

10. To understand well the proper organization, classifica- 
tion, management and discipline of a school, the improved 
methods of teaching, and possess good aelf-c onjjpl. 

No applicant will be awarded a certificate who, on examina- 
tion, fails to answer 80 per cent, of the questions proposed in 
the above branches. 

Regulation 7, — The State Board of Education are deeply 
impressed with the fact that the large majority of the child ren- 
in attendance upon the public schools are the children of the 
poorer people, and will fill the large and important classes of 
farmers, workmen, mechanics and artisans of the State, and 
that to impart to them only the knowledge to be derived from 
the school books, excellent and necessary as it is, will but illy 
equip them for the sphere of life to which in Providence and 
circumstances they are very sure to be called, are still more 
impressed with the necessity of imparting to them some know- 
ledge (to the boys specially) of the useful and necessary tools 
and implements used in the arts and trades, and to the girls 
some training in sewing, cookery and housewifery in general 



24 

hy simple illustrative lectures or talks upon their use, and the 
general principles involved, so that a taste may be cultivated 
for these very useful and important vocations in life, and some 
knowledge imparted of them, but mainly to impress them with 
a true and proper conception of the honor and dignity of hon- 
est labor. County Superintendents and Boards of Public In- 
struction are urgently an rl specially called upon to give their 
earnest attention to this very important feature of school work 
and instruction. 

Regulation 8. — The evil of intemperance abroad in the land 
demands the attention of all true men and women everywhere, 
that its tide may be turned back, and the great social evil 
abated, therefore the State Board of Education calls upon all 
County Superintendents and County Boards of Public Instruc- 
tion to see that the pupils are from time to time, as the regu- 
lar work and duties of the school will permit, impressed with 
the evils flowing from the use of intoxicants and narcotics 
morally, physically, socially and financially, so that a whole- 
ijome conception of ihe evil and ruin wrought by them may be 
had by every pupil. 

Regulation 9. — As the spirit of the school law clearly in- 
tends to prevent entanglement at all possible by contracting 
or bargaining among members of the County Boards of Public 
Instruction, therefore the State Board of Education would 
most earnestly admonish all members of these Boards to en- 
tirely refrain from the employment of persons in any manner 
who are nearly allied to them by by the ties of relationship, spe- 
cially of a close nature, and would especially suggest to thoge 
who in the past have been thus situated to free themselves at 
onue of the entanglement, and tbat in the future no one will 
be recommended for appointment in any relation in the school 
work who contemplates such employment. 

A very considerable part of the dissatisfaction which does 
Hxist in some school neighborhoods is created by this condi- 
tion of affairs, and the general cause of education in the State 
must be relieved of it. 

Regulation 10. — All teachers should of their own purpose 
seek from time to time to advance the class of their certifi- 
icates by diligent and persistent study and the constant read-. 
ang of the best journals of school work, and books treating 
methods, discipline and government of the school, and so pass 
Irom the lowest to the highest grade of certificate, and carry 
with it the increased capacity for the true work of the school 
room. 

County Superintendents discovering a disposition on the 



f 



c 



25 

part of certain teachers to remain content witli an y certificate 
they may be fortunate enough to obtain, exhibiting no desire 
to rise higher or to become better qualified for their important 
work, should at once report the same to the Boards of Pnblic 
Instruct ion and recommend their removal from the corps of 
teachers in the county. 

The authority for mating these Regulations will be found in 
the School Law Pamphlet, pages 7 and 8 t section 13, clauses 
5th and 11th. 



i 



c 



^ . 



27 



Taelb No. 1. 



t 



consuls. 


o 

a 

i. O 


a 

— 

H 

SID 

SB 


■I 

= = 


= ~ 
ISP 

wig" 


if 

5 = 

If© 

< 


h h 

Bg*8 
K 


Number of Col- 
ored Cltlkl ran 
Enrolled. 


w— 
§ a 

Is 
a£5 

^ V — 




no 

35 
51 
32 
20 
44 
71 
37 

6 
7S 
45 
40 

7 
65 
70 
28 
72 
37 
74 
58 
43 
50 
4!) 
17 

9 
70 

Ss 

34 

103 

SO 
75 

23 
62 
74 
35 
35 
59 
41 
00 
23 
60 
26 
63 
41 


5179 

937 

2112 

B8t 

769 
1192 
3149 
-662 

180 
4312 
1400 
3075 

465 
2965 

aoK 

070 
.. 

1181 
3484 
3652 

945 
3376 
1364 

338 

235 
1937 
38S9 

867 
4959 
1063 
2069 
2494 

696 
2179 
2553 
1028 

\m 

2078 
1391 

2681 
702 

1909 
720 

1421 

1421 


756 

1*63 
391 
447 
73» 

2042 
455 
1*8 

3284 
942 

2107 
389 

1838 

1132 
467 

law 

751 

1994 

2032 

640 

2457 

970 

241 

158 

1412 

2753 

754 

SO08 

MB 

1723 

1753 

491 

1842 

lata 

700 
1047 
1453 
922 
I860 
133 
1490 
464 
909 
899 

53.130 


2266 
786 

1690 
465 
584 
893 

1594 
573 
ISO 

i«sa 

1400 

ma 

388 
1U12 
1331 

437 
2041 
1106 
15S4 

837 

911 

532 
1031 

186 

226 
1503 
1632 

832 
2111 

4«ll 
1106 
1859 

646 
■.'1147 
1465 
1014 
1089 
1597 

986 
1543 

MB 
1406 

491 
1290 
1075 


2913 

138 

422 

85 

185 

300 

1555 

90 

2390 

1195 
107 

1953 
»«: 

239 

309 

15 

1953 

2765 

34 

2844 

4*3 

152 

9 

494 

aaaa 

35 

582 

963 

635 

50 

m 

1088 

14 

*» 

481 

405 

1138 
42 
503 
230 
136 
336 


in 




30 
43 
28 
19 
37 
146 
24 

6 
49 
45 
34 

4 
31 
49 
i0 
64 
30 
44 

m 

41 

20 

m 
n 

8 
56 

m 

33 

65 
5 
4U 
64 
22 
58 
52 
35 
29 
49 
33 
46 

n 

47 

IB 
4B 
33 

1.336 


a 

9 
4 

7 

7 

25 

3 

*"S9 

"is 

3 
S4 
21 

8 

6 

I 

30 

27 

1 

30 

10 

6 

14 
3S 

1 
38 

1 
16 
11 

1 

4 
22 

"*8 

10 

8 

23 

1 

13 
8 
5 
8 

513 


89 




50 
88 




26 


CJuy 


40 




77 




29 
(V 




DO 




67 
10 




OH 




88 




79 




89 




74 
02 




4-J 
56 
49 
17 

in 




78 
100 

35 




123 




20 

.67 

8B 

24 


Polk 


67 
78 




38 




64 




49 




72 




23 

17. 


Wnkolla 


88 


Walton 


43 




41 




2,249 


82,323 


50 696 


33572 


2,419 



^ 



2S 



Tablk NO. 3. 



Aliichua 

Biker 

Bradford 

Brevard 

■ i:ulhoon 

City... 

Colombia . , . . 

t-ittnf .-. 

Dade... 

Dnval 

iieSoto 

Escambia 

franklin 

Wad ad en 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Htllsbntontrh. 

Holmea . 

.tactsoa 

Jefferson. ... 
La fay oil e. 




u 



$3.1113,000 00 

544,308 00 

1,124,783 00 

1,007.474 on 

352,SS2 h 

i,aoo,ouo w 

1,600,403 do 

874.752 on 



0.640.610 no 
1,983.04 ' HI 

3,*4».7Ss mi 

405,427 I*' 
1.U18.14W Hi' 
1,0*2,106 00 

SWO.OlMi imj 
3,2CW,0M (Ki 

;U2.064 hi 

1 ."lit, !■•».'. Ill 

1,800,0011 in.. 

sa^.si!-'." 

Leon. | 2,008,413 00 3 

Levy 1,101 Mono s 

Libert)' ' 2»,01200 2 

Lee 876,83400 

Lake.... s.724.;ji; o| 

Madison.. l.aOO.lmi oo 

Manatee | i,U;,w» 40 1 4 ' 5 

Mstnun 4.222,2"o 

Monroe 1.401,468 «ii 4 



.ft 
1 



N««1UI 2.684.3*1 00 1 

Orange .... ' 4.052.5:.; 00 

Oitr-eok. 1.087.806 oil 1 

Polk 3,600,0UO0Q[ 

Putnam 4,130,603 oo! 

1'ast-i 054.329 001 

fit. John* 2.2&o,87u 00 



Santa Bom 

Smnter. 
Suwannee. . . 

Tavlor 

Vol tula 

Waknlla 

w'al ton 

Washington. 

Totalt 



1,2*2*00 00. 
l.Tlu.oiaoo 
],iTt>,;«8 cm! 

3,99i,672 01 

MMM BO 

1.122.774 (XI 
769.6ST00 

fa), 800.871141 1 



3'i 

:. 
*H 

(|, 

5 
3 
31 

^4 
3 

4 




$21,970 73 1 $1,769 87 



2,003 52 
4,783 «W 
3,582 59 
1.831 33 
7. SIT 74 
li.lKk'i 0« 
8,881 M 
34511") 
37.705 80 

14,955 73 
2.448 58 
3.0113 49 
8,8ffl 7(1 
4,843 77 

15.075 07 
1,738 55 
O.H*',l 61 
4,S7S 70 

... 4-. ILi 

6.955 57' 

i,ii4 aa 

4.. r i7rl 08 
14 BH H 

a.on m 

8.044 85; 

17.967 2:11 
ai07 88| 

11,530 00 
T7,il4 74 
1.*!* iv 

15. o w no 

14.566 32 
0,187 841 
S.247 l« 
7,143 60 
8,725 5,-, 
7.760 16 
1,371 5$ 

10,072 W 
1.90595 
5,641 lu 
3,270 10 



1*377.: 



$377.238 V. 



290 30 

872 SO 
224 01 
234 21 
400 90 
788 03 
170 99 
15 86 

2,150 78 
343 10 

1.4H- Hi 
238 53 

1.086 68 
112745 
191 75 

m a» 

328 78 
1,197 7U 
2,276 05 

340 00 1 

2S3 81 1 
157 10' 
115 2*! 
541 SO 

1,404 07 [ 
270 25 

1.952 77 i 
oooso; 

918 60 
324 881 
147 02i 
■•■'A 18 
1.008 80 
git 4 ; 
SMJ7 

vil VJ 
387 IB 
855 37 
215 22 
472 13 
28715 
417 80 
2!)1 171 



iff 

iSfl 



$4,113 00 

l)0t) 80 
1,332 M 

628 70 

548 30 
1,072 80 
1,782 90 

420 30 

38 70 

4,097 70 

• 790 20 

3,287 90! 

65170! 
3,838 70, 
2.158 401 

378 00 
1, W« 00 1 

785 U) 
2,714 40 i 
6,288 10 

702 00 

7, one So 

88150 
367 211 

B7nno 

1,380 00 

MX 40 

630 011 

4,637 BO 

1,827 20 

2,131 20 

7*6 90 

343 80 

1,242 !al 

2.34H no 

544 60 

1.226 8U 

2.073 80 

855 00 

1,989 UU 

502 20 

1,008 90 

822 80 

072 00 

878 60 



ft 

eg 



S3 



813.115 00 

to mi 

8,046 00 
4,320 00 

600 00 
7,426 00, 
6,79000 
3,230 00 

8»l)0t| 

00,000 00 

4.216 m;. 

19,0011 84 

3.0-10 00 

8. WOO 

6,195 oo; 

1,896 00 

13,370 00 

1,606 00 



(380 0* 
9*5 00 
460 00 

Y,3(>6'66 

1.820 00 

360 09 

8.Y50 0U 
750 00 

3,100 00 
350 00 
940 00 

1,616 CO 



2.165 00 
5,100 00 



$32,084 10 $74,807 70 $400,378*4 



11,725 00 
3.131 mi 
15,3*9 00 
2,800 00 
97600 
4,800 00 

l,\s 

8,088 00 
2 600 00 
21,190 00 
18.030 00 
13,880 00 
23,646 00 
2.160 00 
27,400 OO 

8,8*0 00 

4.000 0(1 
10,160 00 

2,0311 00 

3.225 00 

6,000 »n 

8*0 00 



1,320 00 



557 00 

74 00 

1.580 00 

800 nil 

07 no 

646 00 
2,480 00 

548 00 

440 00 
■J, 838 42 
4.600 00 
2,128 Oil 
2,872 00 

220 OIJ 
1,810 00 

at ao 



545 00 

l,3»60O 



808 ao 

500 (Hi 



T A 11 LB No. 3. 



COUSTIE3, 


U 

is 

1,157 
430 
808 
235 
2fi5 
451 
K:i7 
300 
85 
•Mi 
BCO 
934 
143 
525 
710 
3W 

1.055 
647 

., 770 
430 
450 
244 
606 
108 

M 

750 

BM| 

4 12 

1,143 

!«» 

+mi 

8*H 
847 

1,050 
806 
525 
533 
843 

456 
803 

350 

rtv. 

241 
095 
556 


— ± 

el, 


! 

H 

ha 



a " j 

M 

#!-'.-> 00 
4.372 50 
4,170 71 

2.311 50 
I 

;>uooo 

27,72000 
4,862 44 
14.07986 

2,030 00 
7.644 50 

ii.tkAJ DC 

15,835 SO 

244 IK 

fi.Wl 25 
8,31300 

::.22:; 25 

S.5W5 2i 

7,7;:. im 

83ft CO 

424 41 

IS,1(« 86 

4,866 75 
21,50843 
7,704 (W 
10.08288 
lit, 41 XtiJM 
5,013 M 
18,32500 
15,46002 
5,785 85 
0.412 67 
1,983 81 
7,049 42 
7,358 OU 
1,670 00 
13,87600 
2,174 94 
2,91 1 (XI 
3,108 00 

31+ (OS 


■c 

9 

Q| 

3 

^ ° 

u a 
a « 

•5** 

* 

8125 00 
3(.0 00 
350 00 
100 08 

3oooci 

460 00 
300 00 

30000 

1,200 00 

475 00 

900 on 

80 00 

5Q0Oi; 
800 W 

480 i.iei 
60000 

325 00 

ooo oe 

2OO0O 

OUOOO 
480 00 
IM>00 
200 00 
900 00 
774 00 

800 00 

'.(00 00 
400 00 
61002 
1,100 1X1 
80000 
7S8 -JS 
600 80 
438 27 
400 00 
000 00 
600 00 
548 00 

100 on 

4.VI00 
175 00 

200 00 
240 00 


«£ 

"a s 

- 5 i 
5 3 2 

< 


M 

2d 

3 i 

fl 

- — 




1,189 
430 
SR2 
230 
319 
441 
757 
272 
M 

9-40 
750 
tm; 
155 
487 
621 
888 
986 

stn 

457 
401 
288 
47rf 
78 
LBO 
753 
5.50 
430 
957 
362 
007 
Wtt5 
2»fl 

i osa 

659 
472 
556 
754 
5-10 
740 
353 
644 
SO 

57H 
422 


#114 80 
310 80 

78 BO 
324 08 
143 00 
107 69 
174 W 

50 00 
300 00 
400 34 
2IW20 

93 00 

314 Oil 

LOS 00 

sao oo 

65 00 
278 40 

888 88 
83] 80 
837 IS 

237 60 
4.V1 IB 
'jr.',' ::o 
tOl 8« 
430 60 

BOO >'.l 
412 00 
M*01 
281 00 
35100 
4'J4 40 
lis 40 

257 20 

'228 00 
189 00 

258 SO 
83 60 

21103 




Bradford , 


H0 0O 
ISO 06 




50 W 
759 82 




1,104 *■* 




7,-, :t-. 
100 00 




10,8000(1 

12 45 

1,81454 

347 IS 




817 63 
SIS 89 




151 88 
400 W 




10 OO 




549 80 




80s as 

101 14 










Lake * 


88 16 

2,211 'X> 

140 KB 




4BS Si 1 




448 04 




235 55 




83000 




• 


Polk 


74 ::. 

331 00 




119 65 




337 Wi 




3,607 SI 
384 5+ 


Suwannee. . . 


888 88 

15 00 


Volusia 

Wakulla 


io no 

40(H) 
B2U» 


Walton 






544 65 




15,568 


14,884 





30 



Table No. 4. 



COCNTIBS. 


a « 

2- - 

°ss 

Hi 

ill 

7. 


c 
1. 

o a 

Ji.s 
Is 

so 

1474 
46 

141 
45 
64 

144 

744 
51 


I- 


Q 

i- 

B 
K 

IB 
II 


m 

3 

I! 

SB 




8 

1 

13 


1439 

99 

281 
40 
101 
]S6 
811 
SB 


47 
S 

4 
6 
8 

24 

:; 


67 


/ linker 


35 




47 




81 






90 


Clay 


3 

10 

A 


38 




40 

28 




JJoval 


| 


1170 


1214 


50 


73 




50 




9 

1 

10 


5711 

99 

MB 

323 

!I- 
153 

1004 

ui;, 

14 
1S6S 

24U 

75 

8BJ 
823 
35 
1411 
250 
400 
S36 

m 
m 

500 

8 

US 

337 
1MB 
533 

10 
-'42 
110 

60 
129 


em 

1005 

121 

15*5 

7 

tH'.i 

1500 

SO 

147B 

243 

77 

7 

803 

830 

1437 
333 
563 
299 
34 
« 
538 

e 

318 
344 

219 

ete 

15 

201 

120 

71 

131 


31 

4 

34 

V 

B 

1 

U 

so 

1 

33 

10 



1 

15 

48 

1 

48 

5 

23 

14 

1 

4 

13 

• 

13 
U- 

24 
1 

14 
8 
4 
5 


40 




6 




a 

54 
17 




1 


70 
36 




a 

2 


38 




:« 




41 







33 




30 






11 




i 
s 

3 

(J 


9 




03 




53 




34 




75 




15 
45 




s 


74 




23 


Polk 


B 

3 
3 
4 

1 

5 
3 
1 

2 


63 




60 

3B 
43 




51 




39 
48 
IS 


Wnkulla , 


61 

18 


Walton 


.5 
I 


30 




80 








137 


16,918 


16,078 


620 


1,793 



81 



Table So. 5— C«ssr» or School Population, isS3. 



■ 


■ a 


5 


9 


e 


St 


& ■ 


□ 


a 


9 






1 .3 




M 




» 


















a* 






■*M 








3 


* 


a 

i 


a 

a 




s 

it 


9 


P 

<4jf 




* 


I 
B 


a 

V 


s 

^= j 


cousTrEs, 


- ~ 
3% 

- - 




3 —. 

Jiff* 




.£ O 

v. a 
a 




Saf 

3 


3-J 

- 1 


_ -_ 

i ■*■ 

OS 


c _: 


— = 
cv 

i 1 






, w 


. u 


. be 


« .a 


, iff 


. :l 


; j : - 






S a 


a a 


o = 


O i? 


c «- 


3 - 








SS 


! z 

8S6B 
1104 


z 


S5 


* 


SB 


as 


2; 


/■• 


Z 




1345 


4453 
863 


4310 
.583 


3696 
958 


5067 

Ml 




Baker 





1 


5 


13* 




3143 


I860 


11*1 


lOOfi 


1842 


303 





2 


4U 


807 


Brevard 


1117 


873 


:'. M 


493 


8*5 


139 





3 


38 


103 




875 


<tt> 


m 


390 


Ml 


217 








8 


71 


Clay 


vm 


an 


903 


7S5 


IMS 




1 


1 


b3 




Columbia 


4m 


::S75 


MM 


20112 


2341 


20158 


1 


1 


72 


768 




7411 

1111 


0S9 
101 


411 
77 


30* 

42 


877 
11* 


72 
B 















0! 3 


14 




>-039 


7300 


4104 


3035 


3318 


US! 


39 


32 


163 


1240 




2043 


17S6 


iosa 


955 


2018 


35 








7 


21rt 


Escambia .... 


MM 


tan 


aw; 


2922 


3254 


2614 


1 


2 


92 


750 


Franklin 


7!5 




852 


361 


*S8 


237 








*J 


160 


Gadsden . 


5091 


K113 


2539 


2502 


1603 


MM 





12 


ra 




Hamilton. . . . 


28*8 


9*98 


1474 


1373 


17S7 


I uri'.i 


1 


1 


37 


8« 


Hernando 


821 


779 


4JS 


400 


571 


350 








7 


12 


Hillsborough. 


4014 


3523 


2142 


l*-2 


3395 


619 





1 


0* 


753 


Holmes 


1642 


1432 


.852 


7110 


1586 


56 


9 


2 


31 


136 


.laekson 


mm 


3983 


1944 


1761 


195*1 


1749 


17 


B lM 


148 




7719 


6793 


4 1 01 


3018 


i-ct 


MM 


I 


8 43 


459 


Lafayette 


14S0 


1308 


s-;- 


as 


1412 


OS 


1 


1 S*i 


360 


Leon 


MOB 


7672 


4011 


4397 


8*2 


Si. J*) 


!> 


1 IM 


775 


LeTy 


lsi>7 


iea« 


1007 


MO 


1260 


637 








M 


335 


Liberty 


458 


410 


331) 


3 IN 


333 


■J BS 





11 


4 


45 




374 


310 


203 


186 


367 


a 








5 


45 




MM 


2401 


131S 


129^ 


2022 


8M 


1 


2 


51 


337 


Madison ..... 


4441 


333 


22s« 


21.35 


1865 


MM 








87 


*8S 


Manatee 


708 


888 


•;;-j 


330 


662 


40 








7 


M 




7843 


68B4 


3070 


MM 


3389 


4472 


8 


8 


213 


10«3 




5979 


4479 


3111 




3141 


1Mb 








m 


75J. 




3450 


27K7 


17**} 


106* 


1644 


1800 


3 


6 


31 


44S 




aisi 


2870 


1MB 


1490 


3378 




4 


0. 10 


231 




934 


917 


491 


483 


879 


75 





10 


98 


Polk. 


3055 


JTt.c 


1V---J 


1433; 


SMI 


388 


1 


57 


174 


Patnam 


3040 


3737 


1490 


1450 


1117 


lSS 





45 


37, 


Pasco 


1311 


123* 


718 


.v..-, 


1299 


12 


1 


0| s 




St .lotltl". 


2445 


2109 


1036 


1073 


1410 


699 





37 


133 


Santa Rosa... 


2908 


8MB 


1901 


1307 


2170 







2 BO 


M 


Sumter 


1452 


1373 


795 


657 


1019 


483 





01 s 


53 


Suwannee 


3335 


2067 


1351 


1084 


1496 


saw 


8 


3 




*03 


Taylor 


10731 


926 1 


590 


483 


1021 


52 








26 


23* 


1972] 


1S4S 


1034 


943 


150* 


468 





1 


21 


IM 


Wakulla 


871 


753 


388 


362 


556 


315 





2 


10 


105 


Walton 


1509 


12751 


812 


6971 


1368 


3*1 


Oj 


2 








Washington.. 


1389 


1210 


715 


624 


1130 


219 





1 35 


23* 


Totals 


129,112 


118,8*7 


53.812 


H3J300' 


68,514 


60,598: 


s.. 


ST 


uu 


12..VS* 



32 



LIST OF SOPEHIMEIDEKS OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 



POST OFF J CX. 





W. N. SHEATS 


Gainesville. 


BAKER 

HRADFOKU 


G.R. BLAIR 

JOSEPH L. HILL 


McClennv. 
Lake B-stk-r. 


BKEV \KD 


JOE1NU SAMS 


Courtney. 


CALHOUN 


F. M. ATKINS.. 


CITRUS 


E. A. HARRISON 




CLAY 


E. E. RAWLIN 

E. tf. PERSONS 

ALBERT M. FIELD 

H, E. CARLETON 


Green Cove Spring. 
Fort White. 
Lake Worth. 
Fort Green. 


COLUMBIA 

IJeSOTO 


DUVAL. . 


WM. M. LED WITH 

N. B. COOK 




ESCAMBIA 




FRANKLIN 

GADSDEN 

HAMILTON' , 


WM.T. MARLER. 

C. E. L. ALLISON 

GEO. J. GRAHAM 

U». J. R. TEMPLE 

L W BUCHHOLZ 

WHITMILL HURRY 

WM. if: FARKiOR. . 


Xpalachicola. 
Quincy. 


HER NAN DC 


Brtmkbvllle. 


HILLSBOROUGH. 

HOLMES 


Bloomingdale. 
[zugora. 

'JiirapbelltOB. 
Aucllla. 
Sew Trov. 
Tavares. 




JEFFERSON 

LAFAYETTE 

LAKE 


J. A. WALKER 

JOHNC. COMPTON 

D. C. KxNTZ 

N W EPPE* 


LEON 


Fort Myers. 


LEVY 


SHELTON PHILLIPS 

T.J. GREGORY 




LIBERTY 


Bristol. 


MADISON 


R. L. WILLIAMS 




M VN1TEE 


E. M. GRAHAM 




MARION 


MARION L. PAYNE 

FERNANDO F1GUENED0. 

EPHRIAM HARRISON 

JOHNT. I31CEKS 




MONROE 


Key West. 
Dj*& 


ORANGE 




J. V.SPEARS 






R. M. RAY 


Dade Clly. 
Lnktland. 


FOLK 


PETER ARNOW 


PUTNAM 


Pniatba. 


Ht. JOHNS 


St. Augustine. 
Milton. 


SANTAROSA.. 


GEO. W. CURTIS 


SUWANNEE 


C. WHITFIELD 

A. W. MIZELL. 

JOnN R. KELLY 

N. 8 C. PERKINS 

R. F. FORBES..... 

JOHN A.CAMPBELL 

L. L- CHARLES 


Sumterville. 


TAYLOR 


Spring Warrior. 
DeLano". 


VOLUSIA 


WAKULLA 

WALTON 


Craw ford ville. 

KoxHllL 

Vernon. 



1 



i 






1 

1 



— T 



33 

Table No. 6. 
Lift of Teachers holding First-class Certi Scales, Term 5 jenra from date of 



i 



Kiibt-rl Siewart 

Win Li'iia Marios 

n B Wnlioii 

J B Wneli 

J M Sttfwwl 

I) Y Hoyte 

F W Hirtletle 

W G JoIiufod 

R MSmiU) 

A I! »:irt! 

Mr? M»rj U WunbitigluD.,. 

Mrs A A Washington 

Tlifn er - 

.-Mrs H K Ingram 

Mi*t> Louisa Tucker. J 

C H L'mird 

Abner V Ol linger ... 

A W Peek 

-Roht M Ray 

J H ttirardr.tu _ 

•u v F-ikci *r 

K II fiilison 

R V Graham %\. 

His a Biker 

K M Brldgi-n 

EstelU- Willis 

Knmci sen Hunt 

W R Temple 

W K Vaughn 

Cora CbaBC • 

Fauulc M Tborne. 

J li Lyman 

Henry E Graham ; 

Florence Mcllraine. . ... 

Henry Mevy 

Will S Pitch 

A Euloe 

T Ho] I logs worth 

Wm B Catbcart 

Geo W Eatherly 

i John P Patterson, 

"'FGSbell 

MrsE J Wilson 

Ml«s Laura McKlnlay 

Laura E Dyer 

Geo W Housioun (colored) 

Hultie. Stewart 

--j-F L Shl]'Wortb 

Mies Ida Wood 

Mlas Julia A Edwards. 

Emily M Blackmail 

Fannie Henderson , 

UB Hail 

Mrs W K TUomas 

Miss A u iiia LeBarron 

CFDe L&tfaleo 

Annie M Hardv 

3d 



POST OFFICE. CoUSTT, 



Cedar Keys, 



Anthony. 
^lign.' 



... 



:r. 



Muniictllii. 

Tallahassee. 

Apalaclileola. 

Tampa. 

I iimpa. 

Kiesiramce. 

Auopkn. 

San Antonio. 

IstachattM. 

!• u>tis. 

Euatis. 

Eustis. 

Citra. 

Manatee. 

Cedar Key a. 

Lake City. 

Mount Dora. 

Glenriale. 

Snmterville. 

Kali gel I lit::. 

Dude City. 

Penan coli. 

Lake Butler. 

Pen &a coin. 

Pensacoln. 

Tarpon Springs 

Live Oak. 

Miltou. 

While Springs. 

Mount PI ua aim. 

Lloyda. 

Willlston. 

Bluff Bprlngs, 

Concord. 

Craw ford vl He, 

Pensacols,. 

Brooks vi lie. 

DeLand. 



Ai irllBJI. 
jiil'ttin rough 

Brad lord. 

f ii&i ge. 

Orange. 

Grunge. 

< 'range. 

Orange. 

Orange, 

Levy. 

Duval. 

Duval. 

Duval. 

Duval. 

Duval. 

Marlon. 



Sumter. 

Hernando. 

Ji fferbon. 

Le«n 

Franklin. 

IlillplHtruagb. 

Hillsliorougb. 



Hernando. 
Hernuoiio, 
1 'range. 
< I range. 
range, 
Marion. 
Manatee. 
Levy. 



Orange. 

Orange, 

Sum I it. 

Grange, 

Hernando 

Ef omnia. 

Biailford. 

Escnrnbia.. 

Escambia. 

Hillsborough . 

3u wanner, 

Santa Rota. 

Hamilton. 

Gad-den. 

Jefferson, 

Lovy, 

Escambia. 

Gadsden. 

Wakulla. 

Escambia. 

Hernando, 

Volusia. 



r^pi 10. '884. 
*ipt HI, iWt 
xpt in, ]f*H, 
r-Bi-l 11'. 1**4. 
PeUI 12. 188*. 
S. pi 1-- IW**, 
Oct 1*, 1884. 
Oct 14, 884. 
Oct 14, 1*S, 
Nov aw. 1884. 

No* a, i-*q. 

N.pvL'S, 1884. 
Nov SO, 188*. 
N. v25, 1884, 
NovSS, 18-4. 
(JO S IHHrt. 
Oil 8, l 
OctV. 1885. 
Oct 10, 1885. 
Oct 10, 1885. 
Oct 10, \m\ 
No? 3, ISM. 
(Nov 8, 188.*, 
Nov ,••:, 1885. 
Dec 4. 1NS5. 
J n 1, i«NI 
Jan 3, ISNfl, 
.full 9, IK8B 
Feb II, l*8fl. 
Pel. 11, 188«. 
F. b 11, 1880, 
June lt>, 188P, 
Aug 2, 1888. 
Aug 2, 1*86 
■»ug 10, 1886. 
Nov 10, 1886. 
Nov 11, 1888. 
Nov 11, 1B80. 
Nov 12, 188f> 
Nov 20. 1886. 

Dec 30. la-a. 

Dec 24, 1888. 
April 81, 1887. 
April 21, 1887. 
March 33, 1887. 
Maicb II, 1887 
March «, 1887. - 
March U. 1887. 

March SB, 1887. 
Mareh 2», 1887. 
March 26, 1887. 
Mirch 25, 1887. 
March 85, 1887. 
Marcb 25, 1887 
Marcti 25. 1887. 
M»v 3, 1887. 
April 28, IS87. 



34 



L'st of Teacher* Ht.ItHlUf Fh>t-cl*«« rertllicft'es — Cotitlnu- d. 



Ellen F Mmphy 

V. J Iti'li! 

Florida A -in ul 

B uln Budwte 

Mr- Amine \1 Orico .. 

Hunter H W Iberry. .*-f. 

Win Ur* Woodward 

II D II ■wru). 

Mis* i 'oiirlney W Me ide 

Mis> LeUaO Burnett 

Wri Sir ill K M SeinMer 

.1 II IH « mend Y .. 

spj l K-rii.. *:: 

John M F Ernriii 

B VV HeUviision 

M *■■ Mary C Ryder , . , . 

MliisSniub Dngvr 

MtM Nellie W tvil.nu. . . 

\nni-i B Kins .' 

H W l> luillv 

-Iiibll RrmiCtl 

(JruilTL' P Olell 

-H-y Frank P**ca. ....,..£". 

M C Ul-ii I. 

ir<i H Wiirrhier J. 

Mr- E 8 Wnrriner 

R.ilit t* P.Smrle, 1)1.1) 

A F Bisimlt in-i .■ 

Kbn l.i'i'ft A lVooien 

Hr-l H Wallace 

S H Rilev 

Henr? K Mei'ilitb 

Hi** "Cnl«T Zelnler 

J S Curcton 

W H Bdlton.. 

Mi" Ciirric June Abbnlt 

8T WiillilN 

J 11 Powell ., 

Mint* A unit; Hafee •• 

Ml-w l.-.iiisi O'Brli-n .. 

Daniel Ilidllngur. 

C P Snmmer.itl 

S Neville Thompson 

Mt>n Amijr SwearliureTi..,. 

8 CoiupLon 

M W Lewaej 

-T M b< ■ ivncy. ,,•,•,.,..,.••• 

Miin P.m'iiie KuL'ee 

*]i L HnlMfwm 

■ Mi«»M N Look 

Mi-s H-lk' II Willimnn 

Miss Omens Thomas 

W B Thnmn 

Ren hen W-tldron 

Irvi II Wftklron . . . 

Miss M May Taylor, 

N P Collin* 

n"(irjri! g SUlilrt 

Klcm G Torrey 

J L Hi.llinswurib..... 



tost owria. 



Sun Antonio. 
Crown Point. 
Jiicksooiille. 
JiiekHDijviik-. 
flui't City. 
Winkcrii ill. 
full thACiec. 
Wanke'imh, 
Tnltahttfgnn 

T;tllllQ;l9*«e. 

Eustis. 

Katerprfce. 

M:llli*llll. 

Campbell: oa. 

Welhitru, 
F,.u White. 
ZelHrood, 

Oilimdo. 

\|i»l:icliic id i. 

Twlhikisftre. 

Till.iliniwee. 

.fiieksu' villi'. 

J ich«o>ivtlte. 

iIaok«iinvillB. 

Rronksvllle, 

Brtxik-vilkt. 

s*-nuiff-y. 

Lee*hure. 

BriMtkarUle. 

Kruoks villi'. 
B-ook-vtlle. 
Live Oak. 
Qutncy. 

L'iai«r. 

Bloomtleld. 

T.imim 

BliHiinQi-td. 

Bloom (Mi!. 

HI (>i mi Held. 

RIomulieM. 

Bt"iiitDtie.ld. 

Btii<>uilic!d. 

•*arasi)ta. 



Bartow. 
Rurtow. 
Pud seen! ft. 



.tack*onviIlc 
Fort, Meade. 



Fort Meade. 



Fort Meade. 
Lnkekinl, 



Hernando. 
Oaatgr. 

DllVlll. 

Duval, 

Hillslmr'Ujih. 
Ji Tier.-wii. 
i v"'i. 
Jefferson. 
Lrun. 
Leon. 
[dike 

Vi.:ll~hl. 
^laili^ou. 
.) ickeou. 
Suwannre. 
saw uiiiee. 
irnnjfe. 
Online 
Frii- k] in. 
Leon. 
• iron. 

I J 11V il . 

1)111'. ll. 

I'uvnl. 

Hit n undo. 

Herunnilo. 

Aluetvuii. 

I.iki-. 

IliTltlTld I. 
HiTTIH' do. 

llern.iiJii, 

Suit. i n nee. 

liii.Jsile-i- 

■'uillter. 

L -ke. 

Hll'sborottub 

l.-ik», 

Lakp. 

I.ak". 

Uk.'. 

Like. 

I.:ike 

Manatui'. 

Polk. 

L'k.'. 

Polk. 

Polk 

Esciinlhift. 



Dnval. 

Polk. 

Alielino. 

Aieehua. 

Polk. 

Polk. 

Polk. 



\Iiirion. 
Polk. 

fi.lk. 



ime*^, IH-*T. 
Jaly ». 1**7. 
A»!TU8t 18 I.SI7 
August I^K l>*8T. 
.lii-iucl 19. 1S<. 
Aau'U-.t '■£*. 18S7. 
Aiurii 1 19. 18*7. 
3epi 4, 1SST. 
Attipist L»l> 18S7. 
rteoi '.'1. 1M8X 
-it-lit SI, l**7. 

tiecsa lanr. 
Decl, is<7. 
Junt^ ir>, tv 1 *". 
Dee. 23, l*S7. 
ii t h.tsJ 1X87. 

Sfo» i'.», iK 
s.«a3. 

Doe -'. 18817 
i Itt IS, !Sf7. 
Ck'l 15, 1S«7, 
Oct 11'. 18OT. 
Oct 19. IHtMT. 
ue I t9,48H7. 
ii,.; 81, 1887. 
(i.-i iJil, 1H87 
Oct 81. I**7. 
Oct 81. 1887. 
Oft 38, 18V7. 
<Jct a9, 18H7. 
Oct 39, 1887. 
Dec SI, 1687. 
Oct 8, 1.h-i7. 
in- rf.«tlM7. 
Feti t, iSB'j 
p-,.1,1, 1888. 
April 8, 18St. 
pri I 8. 18.8S. 
A|iril 8. 1888. 
A|.til 8, 1-m 

Ajtri' *■ ,rts4 

April 8, 188S. 

i-.'i. IS, 1808. 

Mnv 38. 1888. 

April It), 1888. 

M iv 88, 18,^. 

Mnv ;», 1888. 

Jiii'h- 18. 1888. 

June 89, 18881 

July 18, 188a 

July 14, 1R88, 

July 14, 1888. 

Jalf 14, 1S88. 

M.iv 1, 1S.*S. 

Hu 1. 1*88. 

August 1, 1888. 

. JuWdJl. 1S88 

'August 1,1883. 

IMiL'ust a, 18.8H. 

I August 4, 18«. 



I 



35 



Lint <if Teichere O-ilttlnfj First-class Ccrllfica'ei — Coollriucd, 



post OFFICE. 



1. W B<icli»bf Tampa. 

W H ."atnuier-ill. 



Mr« Mamie U Tliom is Marlmiim. 

jame* M Owens Mm i I la . 

Paiiiite F Owens Matillii. 

i H Tuite. Peameola. 

HenirrO Lnwson Ki*»imm , e. 

Jcia A. Evans Muss riluff. 

J H Bailey Pjil.itksi 

J W i'utiiiti O.iklund. 

J M Bheitor Odin. 

Miss Alice M Fatherly Lnltfwood. 

.Lime* Rimers 

I, B Vtul en Piilatfck. 

Miss Genu Stewurf nilton. 

W li Atllsurt Mill- ii. 

Mr? M.nv M.trt Allison Ap j spk«. 

Mr H F VVilker Auburn dale. 

Wnt T BitinrrmiiQ 

R K Emitter Aatituuln. 

Mt>R Mait^ieS Underwood.. Brmiksville. 

- J111.I.1I1 V«T:I.... UemHil. 

Win Hollo way La Crosae. 

W J Borden ., Oxford. 

F UBekiont Kiteimmee. 

8iiti \L -dik-nti Klutmmee. 

D W Wren B -How. 

C IV II n simian Ur.in^e CitT. 

^JHK.ilkc ■ enter Hill. 

f W F V.pciHP Birlow. 

.1 IV Moure ...,Sr... I\il:iika. 

Mrs A E Kuisr Bagdad. 

Miss Lizzie Itiiiisey. toper, 

M i M J ul 1 1 Mi rusey jasper. 

A J Wood rViliiika. 

J S Freeman I'al itki. 

Miss Urt» Oli.ud Center Hill. 

Bartow. 

Bartow. 

Bartow. 

Khwlnimee. 

Richland. 

1 Hiipola. 

M.iiniiifld. 

Dade City. 

Bn'tow. 



Wui H Kern 

Mrs Alice? I) Kern 

J.'lui .S'i'i.Mv 

Win T Lata*! 

Mi*- Mamie B Riyr. 
MtM MettOTM Murphy 

Mis* Ruby Brooks. 

A H 11 iv. tier 

NnDlo Hatter 

Mr- U B Al-sunil r. . 

Sarnh t,e! ind Carter. liiiaiwille. 

D F M Pruvenee BartOW. 

I-IM.-I il l|) Wolf !>.Im|,,. 



Ilill-horuuiTb 

Lake. 

Jackson. 

Orange. 

Orange- 

Escambia. 



Pot nil b>. 
Orunze. 
Marian. 
Oruoire. 
Wul ton. 
I'm M nil. 
-.1111.1 R'B.l. 

Santa Bonk 

Or.inKe. 

folk. 

Leon. 

Lake. 

Hernando. 

DcSotu. 

Ai.u'linn. 

Sumter. 

Osceola. 

I )- Cfttlll. 

Pn.k. 

Vuluctl. 

Mlnilcr. 
I'u Ik. 
Pulimm. 
Sania Hoea. 
fliimili.in. 
1 [amlrtoil. 
Put nam. 
Putnam. 
Su inter. 
Polk. 
Polk. 
Polk 

OlTlliU. 

Pasco. 

Pa-ro, 

>'■■■■ U. 

Lake. 
P. -Ik. 
Aiacbiia. 

Polk. 

Vulusja. 



Allir4, 188X 
Am; IS, 1888. 
A tig :;0, 1888 
Auk 31, 18U8. 

Auiiai, issu 

ui-mi, mss. 

80.1 1, 1888 
sk.pt I. 
Sept ft, 1888. 
Sept 7, iss-i. 
Sm 1 I, 1888 
Sepl 7, issB. 
Bept T. I8S8. 
Sej.l 17, 1888. 
Bept 17 
3eptl7, 1^87, 
Sopt 17, IS*?. 

< Pot '-*, m-^, 
1 >ct 3, 1S88. 
Oa -i. !->^ 

O.-t 2. lSVi 

Oct is, isaa ■ 

o« it;, i»* 

(let 17. 1888. 

< >et an. 

■ itwi 

Xov B. lS!*>i. 
N..T 10, I • 
Sov 1(1, 18S8. 
Nov 1H. 1888 
N'ov 111, 1888. 
Nov St l*iS8. 
Not 31 

Not 37, 1 H8« . 

Dee I, ■ 
Dee S, 1888. 
Dec 8, E88S. 
I lee 4 . 
Dee 7. • 

!858. 
De >. 1----S, 
Dec 8, l*it 
Dee 8. 
Dec II, 1838. 

Dee 14, 

Dee 17. IS-iS. 

D-i --'I. 1894 

J in -J I 



T~ 



1 



~4 






LETTER. 



Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Education, 
Washington, 1), ft, Xovember 8, 1888. 

Tlie S&norable the Secretary of the Interior, 

Washington, D. C: 

SrR : I Lave the honor to forward herewith a monograph upon the 
History of Education in Florida, by Prof. George Gary Bush, Ph. D. 
(Heidelberg). 

This is one of the series of Contributions to American Educational 
History, edited by Prof. Herbert B. Adams, Ph. D., of Johns Hopkins 
University, the preparation of which you approved by your letter of 
March 29,' 1888. 

This monograph, though written to accompany the series of histor- 
ical papers upon higher education "in the United States, treats not alone 
of higher education in Florida. Its purpose is to set forth, hi addition, 
the growth and development of -the cchool system of the State, and to 
emphasize particularly the rapid advance made in all educational matters 
during the past decade. 

Beginning with the earliest organized efforts to furnish instruction 
uuder the auspices of educational societies, and the attempt to intro- 
duce the system of Fellenberg, a review is given of the journals of the 
Legislature previous to the adoption of the Constitution of 186.'', and 
such facts are presented as bear upon the subject of education. The 
legal organization of the school system, as it existed previous to the 
Civil War, is thus shown, together with the history of the school lands 
donated to the State, and the funds by which the schools were in part 
or wholly sustained. 

The point is made that the early legislation with reference to schools, 
though effected largely by men of wealth, was for the benefit princi- 
P^Mof the children of the poor. 

Wtention is called to the establishment in 1852 of the first public 
school to be sustained by a tax levied upon individual property, and 
(though no uniform system had been secured) to the great improvement 
made during this decade in the condition of the schools. 

3 



4 HISTOBT OF EDUCATION IN FLORIDA. 

The War era passed, the elaborate system of common schools provided 
for in the State Constitution of 1868, and by legislative acts in 1869, is 
reviewed at length, and the substance of these provisions embodied in 
the monograph. 

The favor with which the system was apparently received, and the 
rapidity with which the State board and the county boards were organ- 
ized and entered upon their duties, are touched upon, and then a his- 
tory is given of the development of the system, of the opposition which 
it later encountered,*of the lack of competent teachers, as also of school 
buildings and school funds, until an era of brighter promise is reached. 
From that period, less than a decade ago, the progress made in public 
school education has been most satisfactory, and it is shown that the 
aggregate results will bear favorable comparison with the educational 
statistics of any of the States. Statistics are given which place in con- 
trast the earlier and later years, and exhibit the rapid increase in the 
number of schools, iu pupils, and funds. Mention is made of the valua- 
ble aid rendered to the State by annual contributions from the Peabody 
Fund and other agencies organized for like purposes. 

The duties of the State Superintendent of lust met ion and of the 
Board of Education, of the county boards and county superintendent, 
of the loca I trustees, and the teachers employed in the common schools 
are defined, and the relations they sustain to one another indicated. 

The admirable work done by Northern societies, by the State, and 
by the agent of the Peabody Fund for the education of the.freedmen, 
from the year in which the War closed until schools for colored chil- 
dren were placed upon an equal footing witii the other schools of the 
State, is traced at some length, while the eagerness of the freedmen to 
learn aud the progress they have made is noted, and a history of some 
of the more important schools established for them is briefly given. 

During the past five years nothing else has done so much to elevate 
the standard of education in Florida as the efficient aid rendered by 
teachers' institutes aud normal schools. These instrumentalities, which 
owe their success, in large measure, to the earnest labors and wise 
supervision of the present Superintendent of Public Instruction, are 
described and their importance to the existing educational system ac- 
knowledge*! . 

Eeferenoe is nest made to the academies established before the War, 
and to the present condition of the high schools, which, with a single 
exception, do not compare favorably with schools of like name in the 
older States. Ah 

With a statement of the public lauds received froih the N^^i-d 
Government for the establishment of "two seminaries of learning" 
and an agricultural college and university, the paper takes up the his- 
tory of secondary and higher education. This begins with an act of 
the Legislature in 1851, in which it is provided that "Two seminaries of 
learning shall be established, one upon the east, the other upon the 



LETTER OP THE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION. 5 

west aide of the Suwannee Biver. " These seminaries were located, the 
one at Ocala (later removed to Gainesville), the other at Tallahassee, 
and long remained the only public high schools in Florida. Historical 
sketches of these institutions are introduced, showing the work accom- 
plished by them, their financial resources, the condition of the academic 
buildings and grounds, their educational appliances, and the character 
and attainments of their boards of instruction. 

Ho public institution of Florida has passed through so many vicissi- 
tudes or suffered so much for the lack of friends as the State Agricult- 
ural College. The endeavor has been made in this monograph to present 
with impartiality the facts of itB history, including the acts of various 
Legislatures with reference to its location, establishment, board of man- 
agement, and finances ; and evidence is adduced to show that it is now 
well worthy of the patronage of the State, possessing as it does an able 
and energetic faculty, commodious buildings and grounds, collections in 
natural history, mineralogy, and geology, a well-equipped laboratory, 
an experimental station furnished with excellent appliances for the study 
of agriculture, and a manual training school, which affords practice in 
working in wood and metal and the best facilities for draughting and de- 
signing, A page is devoted to the Florida University, with its meteoric 
appearance and brief history. 

The remainder of the paper is devoted to a description of the colleges 
founded and sustained by various religious societies, to which are added 
a brief mention of the State Institute for the Blind and Deaf, and ref- 
erences to certain schools wboso aim is to furnish a good secondary edu- 
cation. 

- Of the denominational colleges, Rollins College at Winter Park and 
De Land University at De Land, are placed in the first rank of the higher 
educational institutions of the State, and their history, as herewith pre- 
sented, shows tbat in the quality of their work, the devotion of friends, 
and increasing resources, promise is given of a successful future. 

I beg leave to recommend the publication of this paper as a Circular 
of Information, and to subscribe myself, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

N. H. K. Dawson, 

Commissioner.